Archive for the ‘Murder’ Category

One Reason that Abuse Accusations are as Few as They are …

May 19, 2012

… is this approach to addressing them. The article calls him a “former … priest” and “ex-priest,” but that’s not really possible. He’s presumably not serving in his capacity as priest, however. Apparently, he will be in jail for the next 15 years. The full story of his abuse and the Roman hierarchy’s actions in response to him have been well documented (link).

One interesting aspect of the story:

Fiala, who was born and raised in Omaha, was drawn to the Catholic Church in the seventh grade, when he met a priest who wrote a letter of recommendation for him to enter the seminary.

The priest, Daniel Herek, later became an infamous convicted child sex offender in Nebraska.

Meanwhile, John “Black Sheep Dog” Corapi has disappeared.

-TurretinFan

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Don’t Mention God’s Law, Because It’s About the Gospel!

April 7, 2011

True antinomians would simply deny that God’s law has any force. Homiletic antinomians would make a comment like the title of this post. Those who have been influenced by a Lutheran division between “Law” and “Gospel” may even go so far as to suggest that preaching God’s law is actually detrimental to preaching the gospel.

At least, that’s the sense I got from a recent post at the Confessional Outhouse. According to the author, “Zrim,” preaching a sermon against abortion (a rather heinous violation of the sixth of God’s ten commandments) “goes a fair distance to alienate people from the gospel” (emphasis mine).

Yes, Zrim, people may not want to follow a God who has a law like God’s law. People may be turned off by God’s commandments. They don’t love God’s law, they hate it. Preaching repentance and faith is harder than just preaching faith. We get it.

But the gospel that Christ preached was a gospel of repentance and faith. If we want to preach the gospel Christ preached, we are going to have to preach against sin, even if that alienates people. Sorry if that bothers you, but that’s how it is.

I know, I know. I’ve dealt with Zrim before. His response is that he just meant that we shouldn’t bring politics into church. But Zrim has it backwards. We shouldn’t identify something like abortion primarily as political, but as moral. It is first moral and afterwards political. In America today (unlike America 100 years ago) it is a matter that has become politicized. But just because something has become politicized doesn’t mean preachers can’t or shouldn’t preach about it.

Indeed, the politicization of an issue may coincide with an increased need to preach on that very issue! The fact that people may be unhappy to hear the preaching is simply the cost of standing up for what is right. The Bible never tells us to avoid preaching about sins that are well-loved in a community or society. Quite the contrary: in the midst of a society full of fornication, John preached that fornicators have their place in the lake of fire.

And moreover if a particular political party chooses to support what the Bible teaches, and another particular political party chooses to reject what the Bible teaches, that does not make the Bible’s teachings fundamentally “political.” If one political party caters to evangelicals, that doesn’t make evangelicalism fundamentally “political,” even though it may make it a political issue.

The issue of abortion is fundamentally a moral issue. It’s not like the difference between a Chevy or a Ford or the Yankees and the rest of major league baseball (I realize that some people may disagree with me about whether the New York Yankees are a moral issue). It’s not simply a popularity contest. Political candidates may appeal to that issue, but fundamentally the issue is a moral issue. It is right for ministers to preach about it, and frankly in a society full of that abomination, it is hard to understand how ministers could properly perform their role without preaching about it (they will have to answer to God, not me, about that).

I would agree with Zrim if his point is that a church shouldn’t hang banners supporting the New York Yankees up in a church in Boston, because it will alienate people without a good reason. One’s sports allegiance is less important than the Truth. But preaching God’s law regarding abortion isn’t like rooting for the Yankees in Boston. Preaching God’s law is a duty of Gospel ministers. Men, like the Bayly brothers, who preach against abortion should be praised, not criticized, for doing so.

-TurretinFan

Just as Expected …

April 2, 2011

I wish this were only a April 1st hoax, but sadly Muslims have killed completely innocent men in retaliation for the burning of a Koran on another continent (link). And, of course, Muslims were the first to burn the Koran (apparently), as explained in the following video which, though a little tongue-in-cheek, also has a serious point:

-TurretinFan

Kermit Gosnell

January 19, 2011

Apparently Dr. Gosnell has been charged with murder on the basis that 7 of the children he was paid to kill were born before he killed them (link to story). As far as I know, the mothers of the children have not been charged.

World’s Worst Serial Killer

November 19, 2010

No one really knows who the world’s worst serial killer is, and one normally thinks of murderers as being mostly male, but this lady would certainly receive my vote as the most prolific serial killer (link to story).

Responding to Paul Hoffer on Morality and the Gospel

June 3, 2009

In response to anonymous comments on a previous post, Paul Hoffer wrote:

Dear Anonymous, the reason that Dr. Tiller’s murder was intrinsically wrong is because he was deprived of the chance of repenting of the evil that he had done on this earth and truly coming to know the saving grace of Our Lord, Jesus Christ as opposed to merely going to church on Sundays. Since he is now a martyr for the abortion rights advocates, the evil that Dr. Tiller perpetrated gets to continue on.

Another thing that gave me pause was the fact that this man was killed within a Lutheran Church, so called, and dared to call himself a Christian. Obviously he was not familiar with the writings of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the great Lutheran theologian who was killed opposing the Nazis, who wrote about the difference between true grace that comes from Christ Jesus and that which deludes men in his book “The Cost of Discipleship.” He wrote:

[It] is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, Communion without confession, absolution without personal confession. Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate.” pg. 30.

Cheap grace which appears to be preached at Tiller’s church is truly horrific because it justifies one’s sins without achieving the justification or sanctification of the sinner. Whether one is Catholic or Protestant, we all can decry the kind of Gospel that must be preached there.

I answer, going section by section:

“Dear Anonymous, the reason that Dr. Tiller’s murder was intrinsically wrong is because he was deprived of the chance of repenting of the evil that he had done on this earth and truly coming to know the saving grace of Our Lord, Jesus Christ as opposed to merely going to church on Sundays.”

Uh … no. The reason that Dr. Tiller’s murder was intrinsically wrong is because men are created in God’s image and their lives cannot lawfully be intentionally ended by their fellow men without God’s authority.

Uzzah was killed instantly for his sin, without the chance to repent. Furthermore, in general, capital punishment is prescribed by God’s word as the appropriate punishment for numerous crimes (as I’ve laid out elsewhere). The issue is not the fact that death takes away the ability to repent, but that to lawfully kill another person intentionally, one must have divine warrant.

“Since he is now a martyr for the abortion rights advocates, the evil that Dr. Tiller perpetrated gets to continue on.”

He is treated as a martyr by some, to be sure. However, his death will actually discourage other young doctors from taking the path of becoming professional murderers. So, it’s really hard to guage whether his murder will have positive or negative consequences. Consequentialism, however, is a flawed ethic.

“Another thing that gave me pause was the fact that this man was killed within a Lutheran Church, so called, and dared to call himself a Christian.”

Many call themselves Christians who are not Christians.

“Obviously he was not familiar with the writings of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the great Lutheran theologian who was killed opposing the Nazis, who wrote about the difference between true grace that comes from Christ Jesus and that which deludes men in his book ‘The Cost of Discipleship.'”

I don’t have any way of knowing whether he was familiar with those writings or not. I assume this is just a bit of rhetorical flourish by Mr. Hoffer.

“[It] is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, Communion without confession, absolution without personal confession.”

I wonder whether Mr. Hoffer is willing to direct Bonheoffer’s cannon Rome-ward? How often are we reminded of the fact that church discipline in the Roman church is largely lacking!

“Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate.”

The concept of “cheap grace” is one error into which one can fall. It is the error of the libertines. But there is an equally dangerous error: the error of grace cheapend by purchase. The error of legalism that supposes that one’s own works contribute to one’s justification in the sight of God, or that somehow one’s personal righteousness is the basis of or the maintenance of a right relationship before God. Mr. Hoffer is locked on one error, but has he forgotten the other?

“Cheap grace which appears to be preached at Tiller’s church is truly horrific because it justifies one’s sins without achieving the justification or sanctification of the sinner.”

An antinomian gospel purports to justify sinners, just as a legalist gospel purports to justify “righteous” folks. Both are serious errors, for justification is by faith alone – but a true faith is one that comes out of a love of Christ – one that will consequently be accompanied by fruits of that love of Christ. Mr. Hoffer seems to be good at straking the other ditch for its errors – but we invite him to come out of the opposite ditch and join us on the straight and narrow road provided by Christ.

“Whether one is Catholic or Protestant, we all can decry the kind of Gospel that must be preached there.”

Yes, both the legalist and the orthodox can decry the antinomian. Nevertheless, it would be a false ecuminism to suggest that because we both reject the false gospel of antinomianism (live as you please) we are of one mind.

-TurretinFan

Murder Update – Tiller Receives Justice

June 2, 2009

Apparently George Tiller, a notorious murderer of children, was himself murdered by an unknown assailant. It was wrong of the assailant to do this, and yet I rejoice that this killer of children has received substantive (though not procedural) justice that he would not have received under the laws of the place where he was.

-TurretinFan

Thanks to Ms. La Shawn Barber for pointing out both this murder and another murder that happened about the same time (link). In the second case, however, the murdered person did not receive substantive justice – he was not himself guilty of a crime worthy of death (as far as we can tell).

The Editor-in-chief of the Vatican newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano said it, so it must be true

May 21, 2009

The Editor-in-chief of the Vatican newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano has claimed that President Barack Husein Obama “is not a pro-abortion president.” (link) If this is where Benedict XVI is getting his information about the American president (and I’m sure folks will assure me that the pope has other sources than the Vatican newspaper), then it would explain why he did nothing as a nominally Roman Catholic school called “Notre Dame” honored the most pro-abortion president that America has ever had. One really has to read the entire article for oneself (and, as one of my pseudonymous readers likes to point out, just because it is in a news article doesn’t mean its true). The article is from the “Catholic News Agency.”

-TurretinFan

>Archbishop Rino Fisichella and Excommunication for Abortion

March 16, 2009

>In a letter that certainly surprised me, Roman Catholic Archbishop Rino Fisichella criticized the equal application of his own church’s law in the case of a young Brazilian girl who received an abortion (link to story about letter). Apparently, Mr. Fisichella believes that excommunication should not be automatic, since he believes that the murder of the girls unborn twins was necessary to save her “innocent life.”
Remarkably, the article doesn’t identify the odd double-standard of excommunicating the doctors and the girl’s mother, but not excommunicating the man who incestuously raped his nine-year-old step-daughter, placing the mother in the dilemma of killing her grandchildren or risking the life of her daughter.
-TurretinFan

Death of a Non-Martyr

October 12, 2008

There is some very deplorable and evil violence taking place in India. Non-Christians are attacking and killing people and institutions that they believe are Christian. Some time ago I had mentioned that simply being a nun didn’t make one a Christian, and that consequently I would not automatically consider a nun who was apparently killed simply because she was wearing a habit to be a martyr without further investigation. I think some people who read what I wrote had trouble wrapping their heads around the concept.

Perhaps this further sad story of the wicked actions of evil men will help those who had trouble with the nun non-martyrdom issue to see the bigger picture (link) (warning – somewhat graphic description of the persecution). In this case, the woman degraded and killed was actually a Hindu woman who simply happened to work at a Roman Catholic institution.

There is a sense in which she was killed for the faith (since she was killed by Hindus trying to oppose Christianity), but she certainly wasn’t killed for her faith.

For reference, my earlier post in which the nun issue was raised in the comment box can be found here (link) and an earlier post I wrote providing evidence of the lack of faith of one of the most famous Roman Catholics in India is here (link).

-TurretinFan


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