Archive for the ‘Five Kingdoms’ Category

Five Kingdoms Theology

November 10, 2008

There is a difference between the church and the state. They are two different kingdoms, with different spheres of authority. The Bible gives us information on how each sphere properly operates. They are not, however, the only two spheres of authority, contrary to the impressions that some recent advocates of so-called “Two Kingdoms” theology.

There is also the kingdom of marriage. In that kingdom, there is husband and wife. As with the first two kingdoms, the Bible provides guidance as to how this kingdom should be run.

Another kingdom is the kingdom of family. In that kingdom, there are parents and children. As with first three kingdoms, the Bible provides guidance as to how this kingdom should be run.

Another kingdom is the kingdom of the workplace. In that kingdom, there are masters and servants. As with the first four kingdoms, the Bible provides guidance as to how this kingdom should be run.

Perhaps only in the cases of Adam and Noah (we might also add Abraham) can one find all these kingdoms together. Adam (and likewise Noah) was the spiritual leader, the civil leader, the husband, the father, and the master. We have different roles. Nevertheless, we should live our lives, in whatever roles we find ourselves, in accordance with the Word of God.

That means:

– In our church, we should look to God’s Word regarding the elders, the deacons, and the brethren;
– In our state, we should look to God’s Word regarding the king;
– In our workplace, we should look to God’s Word regarding the masters and the servants;
– In our marriage, we should look to God’s Word regarding the husband and the wife; and
– In the family, we should look to God’s Word regarding the parents and the children.

In all things, we should seek to govern our lives in accordance with the Word of God found in Holy Scriptures. That is the sort of “theonomy” that I favor: a five kingdom theonomy. It is a theonomy in which we let the Word of God govern and instruct us in every part of life – in all seven days, not just Sundays – in all spheres of life – not only those designated “religious.” There are many authorities that God has set up in various aspects of our life. When we serve as an authority, we must look to God’s Word for guidance, and when we serve under an authority, we must likewise look to God’s Word for guidance.

-TurretinFan

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